Mob Justice in Nigeria

From Emergent Africa Thu Nov 15 2012, 06:00:00

In The Atlantic Teju Cole asks?:

Why is lynching so common in the West African country?Lynching is common in Nigeria. Extrajudicial killing is often the fate of those accused of kidnapping and armed robbery, but also of those suspected of minor crimes like pickpocketing. These incidents, if reported at all, get one or two paragraphs in the newspapers and are forgotten. Nevertheless, the killings of the Aluu 4, as they have come to be known, touched a nerve in Nigeria. This was in large part because the murders were filmed and uploaded to YouTube and, soon after, seen by many among Nigeria's huge population of internet-savvy youths. In the days that followed, there was a pained and horrified discussion across Nigerian social media. How could this happen? What sort of society had we become? Would the guilty be caught and punished?More here

[view whole blog post ]
 See More    |     Report Abuse


You might also be interested in the following news stories:

South Africa:   Zulu King Not Guilty of Promoting Hatred - Rights Commission (news)
News24Wire
30 September 2016

The SA Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) on Friday said it did not believe that King Goodwill Zwelithini was guilty of promoting or propagating hatred against migrants on March 15, 2015, during a speech ... [read more]

Kenya:   Geothermal Development's Turn to Profit Tilts Energy Mix (news)
The Nation
30 September 2016

The Geothermal Development Company (GDC) broke the loss making streak to post Sh1.6 billion net profit in the full year ending June 2015 after inking a deal to sell steam from its Olkaria wells to the ... [read more]

Nigeria:   Unicef - 400,000 Children Under-Five Threatened By Severe Malnutrition (news)
This Day
30 September 2016

The United Nations International Children's Education Fund (UNICEF) has raised an alarm that an estimated 400,000 children under five of age will suffer from acute malnutrition in North-eastern ... [read more]



blogAfrica is allAfrica.com's platform to help you keep an ear on the African blogosphere. We draw diverse voices from around the world who post regularly and insightfully about African issues. Bloggers, submit your blog's rss-feed!