Building Small Dams

From Timbuktu Chronicles Tue Dec 25 2012, 12:00:00

An incremental infrastructure solution.Referring to a micro-hydro power facility that supplies the Kagando Christian Hospital, G. Pascal Zachary writes in the IEEE:

What works for Uganda has enormous promise all over sub-Saharan Africa, the most energy-poor region in the world. Excluding highly developed South Africa, the region has only about 30 gigawatts of installed capacity, about the same amount as Poland. But to spread the benefits of microhydro would take a seismic shift in the continent's usual electrification paradigms and--perhaps more ambitiously--a renunciation of the crippling mix of politics and patronage that have left the continent with some of the worst electrification rates in the world. And nowhere are the tensions over microhydro more apparent than in Uganda, with its many rivers, including the Nile.

image courtesy of Steve Stankiewicz

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