What's for dinner in 2035?

From Global development | The Guardian Sat Jan 5 2013, 18:30:00

Alex Renton imagines what two families - one rich, the other hard-up - might be eating in the future

Predicting what we will eat in Britain in 2035 comes down to how gloomy you are about the future. Will stagnant growth have pushed us down the list of rich nations so far that we can't import any foods any more? Or will new energy sources and acceptance of food bio-tech mean that 3-D food printers will be pumping out nutritionally enriched burgers and sushi in all our homes? Will climate change mean land in Britain has to be devoted to crops, not meat, to keep 70 million of us fed?

The hard-up family

We're growing as much food as we can in the back garden. Food costs are using nearly half the family income, compared with just 12% for our grandparents, so we throw away very little indeed.

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