Timbuktu's Lost Libraries

From MEI Editor's Blog Tue Jan 29 2013, 18:19:00

All wars lead to some destruction of parts of the world's cultural heritage, but the deliberate burning of books and the destruction of works of art seems a particularly barbarous event. It is especially outrageous when it is done in the name of the very religion that created the books and art. Yet the Jihadis who burned the Ahmed Baba Institute in Timbuktu (having already destroyed most of the Sufi shrines in the area) have almost certainly burned far more Qur'ans than Western Islamophobes have ever dreamt of doing. When the Taliban destroyed the Buddhas of Bamiyan it was equally appalling, but at least they could claim to be destroying idols; in Timbuktu, the modern Vandals destroyed some of the most precious treasures of Islamic culture.

European Image of Mansa Musa

The golden age of Timbuktu was golden indeed, and the wealth of the 14th Century Emperor Mansa Musa was so vast that even the European map at left considered him one of the main points of interest in all of Africa.

[view whole blog post ]
 See More    |     Report Abuse


You might also be interested in the following news stories:

Lesotho:   Leaders Agree to Reconvene Parliament (news)
allAfrica.com
1 September 2014

The leaders of Lesotho's coalition government have agreed on a timetable for resuming sittings of the country's Parliament. [read more]

West Africa:   Ebola Health Workers Should Get Danger Money, Expert Says (news)
Thomson Reuters Foundation
1 September 2014

Doctors and nurses fighting the world's biggest outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa should get incentives including better pay, insurance and access to the new Ebola drug ZMapp, an ... [read more]

West Africa:   A Call for Appointment of ECOWAS Special Envoy on Ebola (document)
Open Society Initiative for West Africa
1 September 2014

Civil Society Statement on the Current Ebola Crisis in West Africa: [read more]



blogAfrica is allAfrica.com's platform to help you keep an ear on the African blogosphere. We draw diverse voices from around the world who post regularly and insightfully about African issues. Bloggers, submit your blog's rss-feed!