Egypt Two Years After Mubarak

From MEI Editor's Blog Mon Feb 11 2013, 22:10:00

Two years ago today, Husni Mubarak stepped down. The immediate thrill of revolutionary victory was soon tempered by a heavy-handed and often incompetent military council, and since the elections by a heavy-handed and often incompetent elected government and a growing disconnect between secularists and Islamists, each in their way denying the other's claim to legitimacy. I love Egypt but also reject the idea that nothing has changed, or that Morsi is just a warmed-over Mubarak. (And if he is, he's one you elected.)

So, repeating my post of two years ago today, remembering that for 5000 years the Nile has united the country, and remembering the poet's words (below), the national anthem:

From Wikipedia, the lyrics in English, Arabic, and transliterated Arabic (compared to the sung version on the video, the second and third verses are flipped and the last verse differs in a couple of lines):

My country, my country, my country.

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