Transitioning African Liberation Movements to Governments

From The Official Blog of Amb. David H. Shinn Sat Nov 24 2012, 10:38:00

South Africa's Brenthurst Foundation commissioned Christopher Clapham, until recently editor of The Journal of Modern African Studies, to summarize the views presented at a dialogue held in Italy on the transition of African liberation movements to governments. Published in November 2012 and titled "From Liberation Movement to Government: Past Legacies and the Challenge of Transition in Africa," the analysis draws on the experience of numerous movements including those in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Rwanda and Uganda.

Clapham concluded that nowhere in Africa has a liberation movement transformed itself seamlessly into a national government. Governing a state presents numerous challenges that are not only different but, in some respects, clash with the principles behind a successful liberation struggle.

Click here to read the report.

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