When Artifact 'Became' Art

From Emergent Africa Tue Nov 27 2012, 06:00:00

The NYTimes profiles an upcoming show "African Art, New York and the Avant-Garde," at the Metropolitan Museum:

The assistant curator of African art at the museum, Ms. Biro will use European and African works, as well as American photographs and ephemera, to illuminate the period between 1914 and 1932, when New York's artists, dealers and connoisseurs first began to appreciate African wood sculptures as art objects rather than ethnographic artifacts. Her exhibition will include about 40 masks, figurative sculptures and other decorative objects from West and Central Africa; paintings that were once exhibited alongside them by artists like Francis Picabia, Constantín Brancusi and Diego Rivera; and photographs by Alfred Stieglitz and Charles Sheeler, among others, drawn from 18 public and private collections as well as the Metropolitan's own holdings.More here

Image courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum

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