A broken, medieval, retarded society? - Timothy Kalyegira

From Emergent Africa Sun Jan 6 2013, 06:00:00

In the Monitor, Timothy Kalyegira's scathing indictment of Uganda's ruling elite and 'middle class':

Since 1962, a small indigenous middle class has been slowly emerging which defines itself in terms of the way it dresses, drives and drinks, rather than the way it thinks and the inventive and intellectual output of its mind and factories.

The pattern of development and growth taken by Uganda since 1962 is one of growth by material addition, not growth by mental and intellectual probing and experimentation, a society of more cell phones than books sold, 100 times more Facebook users than book buyers.

Most African countries in 2012 are in material terms where Europe was in the 1890s but intellectually are where Europe was in the 1300s. That image of ...

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