Letters: Aid to Ethiopia

From Aid | The Guardian Mon Jan 14 2013, 20:59:01

Your report (Report, 10 January) accusing the government of funding the Liyu police force is misleading. Not a penny of British money will go to the Liyu force. We take human rights extremely seriously and recognise that reform of the special police is critical for achieving a safe and secure Somali region. That's why we are discussing with UN partners how we might work together to improve the police's human rights record. This is something that Human Rights Watch has called for. The Peace and Development programme as a whole will help over 300,000 people get access to safe, clean water, give thousands of young people an education and help 700,000 people get a job and earn an income. This is in addition to the hundreds of thousands of people who will receive better access to justice and security. The Somali region of Ethiopia is one of the most deprived areas in the country. This programme is intended to create the conditions they need to lift themselves out of poverty.

Lynne Featherstone MP

International development minister

Ethiopia

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